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Renaissance Catalog


Other Renaissance books that may be of interest from the Poetics catalogue:
  • Clark, Donald Rhetoric and poetry in the Renaissance; a study of rhetorical terms in English Renaissance literary criticism. New York, Columbia University Press c1922. Clark, Donald Lemen, 1888-1966.(An able work.)

  • Poétiques de la Renaissance : Genève : Droz, 2001. 2001

  • Renaissance-Poetik = Berlin ; New York : W. de Gruyter, 1994. 1994

  • Houston, John Porter. The rhetoric of poetry in the Renaissance and seventeenth century Baton Rouge : Louisiana State University Press, c1983. 1983

  • Link, Jochen, 1943- Die Theorie des dichterischen Furore in der italienischen Renaissance. [München?] 1971. 1971

  • Links


    Renaissance Dante in Print (1472-1629)

    THIS EXHIBITION presents Renaissance editions of Dante's Divine Comedy from the John A. Zahm, C.S.C., Dante Collection at the University of Notre Dame, together with selected treasures from The Newberry Library. The Zahm collection ranks among the top Dante collections in North America. Purchased for the most part by Zahm in 1902 from the Italian Dantophile Giulio Acquaticci, the 15th- and 16th- century imprints presented here form the heart of Zahm's collection, which totals nearly 3,000 volumes, including rare editions and critical studies from the Renaissance to the present. The nine incunable editions and nearly complete series of 16th-century imprints featured in this exhibit constitute essential primary sources for both the history of Dante's reception during the Renaissance and the early history of the printed book.


    Luminarium: Anthology of English Literature

    Anthology of English Literature: Middle English Literature (1350-1485) | Sixteenth Century Renaissance English Literature (1485-1603) | Early 17th Century English Literature (1603-1660) | English Literature: Restoration and 18th Century (1660-1785)“
    In this Work when it shall be found that much is omitted, let it not be forgotten that much likewise is performed.”
    —Samuel Johnson